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Bloomberg: ‘Silent Famine’ as Food Soars

Posted by Sada Mosler on April 22nd, 2008

Seems they still think it is about money.

Probably an actual shortage at this point.

The political response will be to give people more funds to buy food that does not exist and drive prices ever higher.

`Silent Famine’ as Food Soars, WFP Warns

by Jason Gale and Paul Gordon

(Bloomberg) A “silent famine” risks emerging in some Asian countries where food prices including rice are escalating beyond the reach of the poorest people, the World Food Program warned.

“There is food on the counters and on the shelves in stores but there is a certain population that cannot afford that food,” Paul Risley, a spokesman for the United Nations agency, said today. “There’s a risk of a silent famine.”

Record prices for rice and wheat are ratcheting up the cost to aid agencies of providing relief, Risley said from Bangkok. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon said yesterday that rising food costs may hurt economic growth and threaten political security.

“In Asia, supply is not the main constraint, but the huge price increases are,” said Rajat Nag, managing director at the Asian Development Bank. “That has a very massive impact on the poor and we need to focus on the huge price increases.”

`We’re Struggling’
“We find we can’t buy as much rice as we thought we would be able to buy,” Risley said in an interview with Bloomberg Television. The agency feeds 28 million of the poorest Asians across 14 countries. “Because of the high prices right now, we’re struggling,” he said.

One Response to “Bloomberg: ‘Silent Famine’ as Food Soars”

  1. Winslow R. Says:

    Sounds like there are shortages…

    Japan’s hunger becomes a dire warning for other nations

    “Arguably Japan’s biggest concern, however, is its weakening ability to sustain its population with domestic produce. In 2006 the country’s self-sufficiency rate fell to 39%, according to the Agriculture Ministry. It was only the second time since the ministry began keeping records in 1960 that the population derived less than 40% of its daily calorie intake from domestically grown food.”

    http://business.theage.com.au/japans-hunger-becomes-a-dire-warning-for-other-nations/20080420-27ey.html?page=2

    Reply

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